BUILDER Top Brands in 2017

Marvin Windows and Doors and Integrity Windows and Doors are recognized as Top Brands in 2017.

For the second year in a row BUILDER Magazine recognized Marvin Windows and Doors and Integrity Windows as top brands in the 2017 BUILDER Brand Use Study, an annual in-depth survey conducted by BUILDER. This case study highlights the brands professional builders use most across 70 product categories and how these brands rank in terms of quality.

“We are incredibly honored to receive these accolades from professional builders, who know our products best. We don’t take lightly the trust builders have placed in us when they choose our products. To be recognized for delivering high-quality products is a reflection of the high standards and attention to detail we insist upon at every step of our process. We’re committed to the success of our builder partners and will continue to produce high-performance window and door products that they can rely on, year after year,” Kris Hanson, senior manager, group product management at Marvin Windows and Doors and Integrity Windows and Doors.”

Marvin Windows and Doors are built on a heritage of quality and innovation, continuously leading the industry in product design and function. Each window is made to order, to meet builders’ exact specifications. With customization capabilities, exclusive innovations, high-performance energy efficiency options and unmatched personal service at every point in the process, builders are able to find beautiful windows and doors for the project at hand.

Integrity Window and Doors’ fiberglass solutions are made with Ultrex® – a state-of-the-art pultruded fiberglass that is eight times stronger than vinyl, three times stronger than wood/vinyl composites and as strong as steel. Integrity offers an All Ultrex fiberglass line, as well as a Wood-Ultrex line that combines an authentic wood interior with a virtually indestructible fiberglass exterior. Integrity’s Ultrex resists rotting, warping, fading and chipping. It is the first and only finish to have achieved 624-10 verification from the American Architectural Manufacturers Association (AAMA), and many Integrity products offer IMPACT zone 3 certification for coastal projects.

Read the entire press release at PRNewsWire.

 

May is National Home Improvement Month

In honor of May, National Home Improvement Month, the National Association of the Remodeling Industry (NARI) is providing chapters and members with tools to get homeowners interested in remodeling this season.

To read the entire press release and download free resources, check NARI.org.

Don’t miss your opportunity to position your company or chapter as an expert during the Month of May.

 

Integrity Announces 2017 Red Diamond Achiever Awards

Integrity Windows and Doors has opened the door for entries for its 2017 Red Diamond Achiever (RDA) Award Program. RDA is an annual competition honoring the extraordinary work of industry professionals using Integrity window and door products in residential and commercial projects.

Through 10am CST on July 14, 2017, the RDA Award program gives professional the opportunity to showcase their efforts, earn industry recognition, and join a select group of past RDA award recipients. Winners of this year’s competition will receive one VIP trip to the Integrity headquarters in Warroad, Minnesota, a donation to the charity of their choice, public relations support, and a winner’s badge for marketing use.

The panel of national recognized industry experts will select up to five Red Diamond Achiever Award winners based on:

  • Creativity
  • Overcoming construction challenges
  • Architecture
  • Complexity and Sustainability

All projects must be completed in order to be up for consideration.

The 2017 judging panel includes:

  • Lou Manfredini – nationally recognized DIY expert, host of As Mr. Fix-It, Lou Manfredini’s Home Improvement Minute, HouseSmarts, and TODAY contributor
  • Brian Pontolilo – consulting editor at Fine Homebuilding
  • Shawn McCadden – nationally known speaker, business trainer, columnist, and award-winning remodeler
  • Christine Marvin – fenestration expert and director of corporate strategy at Marvin Windows and Doors

Read the rest of this article and then apply to the Red Diamond Achiever Awards by visiting: DWMMag

 

Welcome to the Age of Big Glass Windows & Doors

Big Glass Windows and Doors Revolution

Homebuyers are willing to pay more for natural light and multiply living space.

Residential architects, builders, and developers are no longer held back from incorporating oversized glass in their exterior home designs. This natural light revolution has become a hit to both millennials and baby boomers.

Benefits of Big Glass Windows

This big glass transformation of the home equates to: low energy bills, warm interiors, less outside noise, and aesthetics.

Builders also reap the benefits: three out of four surveyed home buyers said they’d pay a $4,000 premium for a large retractable glass sliding door, according to John Burns Real Estate Consulting, an independent research and advisory firm.

Surging demand to meet numerous big glass strategies include:

Mulling Windows

Designers and builders are implementing mulling arrangements that can include many formats from double- and single-hung, glider, awning, and casement to innovating corner windows for panoramas.

Large Glass Doors

A seamless transition from indoor and outdoor space, life-and-slide, multi-slide, and bi-fold glass doors are in play.

Large Windows

Home buyers are seeking single-hung, double-hung, and casement windows. They are looking for bigger sizes. Marvin double-hung windows, for example, are now available in standard sizes up to 5 x 10 feet. Single fixed casement windows are now offered at sizes up to 6.7 x 10 feet.

What’s next?

Bet on bigger. Today any interior space can be transformed by big glass windows and doors to feel even larger and more connected to the outdoors.

Source: Builder.com

 

6 Must-Do Outdoor Spring Home Maintenance Tasks

Spring is upon us and now is the perfect time to implement these 6 outdoor spring home maintenance projects.

1. Clean gutters

Consider this a bi-annual outdoor maintenance task. Look in gutter bottoms for loose granules that signal your asphalt roof may need replacing.

2. Inspect your roof

Look for curled and missing shingles, rusted and pitted flashing, and cracked caulk around pipe collars, skylights and other roof penetrations.

3. Repair paint

Scrape off any chipped and peeling paint and spot painting exposed surfaces.

4. Trim overgrowth

Spring is a good time to trim branches of shrubs and trees away from your house since you’re still able to see individual limbs. Keep branches 5 to 7 feet away from your home so they can’t conduct moisture onto your roofing and siding. This will also deter squirrels and raccoons from find their way to your attic.

5. Ensure good drainage

Check drainage to make sure the soil slopes away from the foundation walls at least six vertical inches over 10 feet.

6. Check foundation vents

Homes with crawl spaces have vents along the foundation walls. The vents provide air circulation that help dissipate excess moisture and prevent mold growth.

Want more details on these 6 maintenance tasks?

Check out the rest at DIYNetwork.com

 

How to Clean Windows Like a Pro

How to Clean Windows Like a Pro

Ideally, windows should be washed twice a year, but it’s a task most people don’t look forward to. Part of what makes window washing such a chore is that homeowners insist on doing it with wadded-up paper towels or newspaper, spray cleaner, and a ton of elbow grease.

It’s easier and more effective to clean glass like the pros do: with a squeegee and a few other readily available tools

Step One – Wash with a strip applicator

Picture windows call for large tools. The long cloth head of a strip applicator soaks up a lot of soapy water and knocks dirt loose without scratching the glass. For cleaning solution, just use dishwashing liquid with warm water – the less suds the better.

Step Two – Wipe clean with squeegee

Starting at the top left, pull the squeegee over the soapy pane in a reverse-S pattern (left-handers would start at the top right). At the end of each stroke, wipe the squeegee’s blade clean with a lint-free rag. Cloth diapers or old linen napkins are perfect for this task.

Step Three – Dry off remaining drips

Remove any water remaining on the edges of the glass with a damp, wrung-dry chamois, which soaks up wetness without leaving streaks. Dry the windowsill with a rag.

Step Four – Customize the squeegee

To clean a divided-light window, you need a squeegee that fits the panes. You can use a hacksaw to cut one to size. You can trim the metal ¼ inch narrower than the windowpane, and cut the rubber blade to fit the entire pane.

Step Five – Scrub the panes (Multipane)

A handheld sponge or hog-bristle brush works best on multipane windows. You can use the same solution of dish-soap and water.

Step Six – Wipe clean with squeegee (Multipane)

Pull the squeegee down each pane in a single stroke from top to bottom. After each stroke, clean the blade with a rag so it doesn’t leave streaks. (If the squeegee squeaks a lot, add a bit more soap to the water.) As above, remove any streaks on the glass with a chamois, and dry the muntins and sill with a rag.

Step Seven – Get rid of stubborn spots

Over time, hard-water runoff from masonry or rain falling through metal window screens leaves stubborn mineral stains on glass that normal washing can’t erase. After regular cleaning, you can wet the glass, and gently use fine 000 steel wool to “superclean” stubborn spots.

Source: This Old House

 

WindowPRO Earns Prestigious Guildmaster Award

The WindowPRO team is thrilled to be honored with the 2017 Guildmaster Award for unwavering commitment to customer satisfaction. Since 2005, the Guildmaster Award has recognized companies within the GuildQuality community of quality who consistently deliver exceptional customer experiences. 

In order to be recognized as a Guildmaster Award winner, WindowPRO was required to achieve a recommendation rate of 90% as well as a certain response rate based on volume. Read the full list of qualifications.

WindowPRO has been recognized for quality and customer service by Angie’s List in 2015, 2014, and 2013 as well as being awarded Dealer of the Year by Window & Door Magazine in 2013 and 2010.

Considering replacing your old, inefficient windows or doors? Discover the WindowPRO difference or contact us today!

 

Securing Windows

Window shopping is a favorite past time for burglars. Inadequately protected windows are easy marks for intruders who have an arsenal of tricks or the quickest, easiest ways to force them. But safeguarding your home’s windows is neither difficult nor expensive.

Start by taking a quick survey of your windows – including those in the basement and the garage and any second-story windows that would be easy to reach from the ground. List each one on a sheet of paper, noting its type (such as double-hung or casement) and the kind of lock it now has.

If you’ve identified a few windows that you think are especially vulnerable, you may feel that even sturdy locks aren’t sufficient protection. In this case, consider replacing the standard glazing with impact-resistant acrylic or polycarbonate or with high-security glass. Or, where appearance isn’t of prime importance, install metal grille outside the window or a scissors-type security gate on the inside.

The ordinary sash latches on double-hung windows may help squeeze out drafts, but they offer little protection against break-ins. An intruder can simply insert a knife up between the sash and flip the latch open, or if he’s in a real hurry, force the lower sash and snap the latch of with very little effort.

  1. One of the easiest and least expensive ways to secure a double hung window is with key-operated lag screws, available in kits at most hardware stores. Pre-drill the sash, and insert the screws through their recessed washers. Tighten the screws with the special key provided. Drilling additional holes in the upper sash will let you keep the window locked in a partially open position for ventilation.
  2. Easier still is wedging the lower sash in its fully closed position with a length of scrap wood. Cut the strip to the exact size, fit it into the channel that operates the lower sash, and tack it in place. This solution is best served for windows you don’t open often; it’s not as tidy-looking as lag-screw locks, and it won’t let you secure the window in a partially open position.
  3. If you’d rather not drill extra holes in your sash but want the protection of a keyed window lock, replace the original sash latch with a key-operated lever. be sure to keep the key near enough for a quick emergency but out of reach of a prowler’s exploring hand.
  4. A keyed bolt-action lock has the added advantage of letting you lock the window in various open positions – just install additional brackets on the upper sash.

Casement windows are one of the most secure types you can own. A casement that’s strong and in good condition may not need a lock at all. If the window is large enough to admit an adult (and it opens to more than about 6-1/2 inches), simply consider removing the operator crank and keep it well out of window reach.

Install a chain lock (the same type used on doors) to limit the distance the window will open. For maximum security, fasten it to the sash and frame with the longest screws that the window will accommodate.

Like sliding glass doors, most sliding windows are all too easy to lift out of their tracks or jimmy open with a pry bar.

  1. to keep window sash securely in their tracks, drive sheet-metal screws partway into the upper tracks. Adjust the screws so the window barely clears them as it slides, with no wiggle room for maneuvering the sash up over the lower tracks.
  2. A simple metal clip will prevent a burglar from prying open the sash by snapping the brittle metal catch that holds the window closed. Bend the clip to fit your window channel, and install it in the lower track wedged against the closed inner sash.
  3. Key-operated locks are perhaps the most secure way to protect sliding windows, and they’ll work with vertical sliding windows, too. 

Basement windows (and, in older homes, unusual coal chutes) are potential points of entry that many home owners don’t think about until it’s too late.

  1. If your basement windows don’t have locks, drive long screws into the stop on each side at a height that will let you open the window only a few inches.
  2. A keyed sliding-bolt lock (or a sturdy hasp fitted with a keyed padlock) offers still more security and the opportunity to make a quick exit in an emergency. Keep the key nearby but beyond reach of someone outside the window.
  3. If you’re concerned about an intruder breaking glass to gain access, but you’d still like use of the window as an emergency exit, install a scissors-type gate with a keyed padlock. Again, keep the key handy and easy for family members to find.

For more tips and tricks about home window security, visit our source: Better Homes & Gardens

 

Tips for Choosing Efficient Windows

Chances are that the main reason you are replacing your old windows is to upgrade to more energy efficient models. Window companies have improved their offerings so they now help save you money on your energy bills all year long. But it’s easy to become overwhelmed trying to figure out which window are right for your home. Shopping locally is a good idea. Windows vary by region, so you’ll get the best advice from retailers that have experience in your climate. Remember, as with anything, you get what you pay for. Go cheap and you’ll end up replacing your windows sooner than expected. To help choose energy-saving windows, here are some tips.

Wood

New window frames made of wood are the most popular and very energy efficient. They are easy to maintain and can be painted to your desired color. They are however, susceptible to rot and insect damage, but better window makers offer them clad in vinyl or aluminum. They tend to cost more, but they offer the best look for both inside and outside your home.

Vinyl

With their good moisture resistance, vinyl windows are a good choice. they are equally energy efficient to wood windows if they are insulated. they are also low-maintenance but do fade over time, especially in darker colors, which can also become brittle as they age. you can restore the finish with a soft scrub cleanser should the frames become dull. They’re slightly lower priced than wood windows.

Aluminum

These windows are strong but not very energy efficient because they conduct heat. condensation can form, creating moisture issues, including frost in the winter. most often, these are the cheapest windows you can buy.

Fiberglass

Window frames made of fiberglass are offered by some of the major manufacturers as alternative to wood or vinyl. they are high maintenance, as they need painting. they are also more expensive than insulated vinyl windows.

Composite

Composite windows look like wood and most makers refinish them in a host of colors. They preform well, but you may not like the look of a full composite window on the inside of your home. To solve this issue, some makers use composite materials on the outside of the window and wood material on the inside. cost is about the same as vinyl windows.

Tips for Choosing Energy Efficient Windows

  • Look for Low-E coatings on the glass. These coatings reflect heat inside your house and reflect UV rays from the sun outside your home.
  • Casement and awning windows are the most energy efficient because they clamp more tightly against the weather stripping in the frame than double-hung windows.
  • look for windows with multiple panes of glass separated by low-conductive argon or krypton gas filling and warm edge spacers with tightly constructed frames.
  • the best weather tipping on any kind of operative window is a compressible gasket type much like your would find on your car doors. The weather stripping combined with a quality latch will effectively keep out cold air and rain, plus keep warm air in in winter.
  • Look for windows with Low U-values or U-factors. These windows have the best insulating properties.

Source: HGTV

 

Neolith Tiny House

From millennials to empty nesters, there is a social movement for people to downsize homes for a simpler, lower maintenance lifestyle. However, downsizing doesn’t have to mean giving up luxuries and amenities of full-size homes.

Learn more about the Neolith Tiny House, their building process and upcoming presentations here.

 
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